Solidarity Square, Three Crosses Monument

Gdańsk, pl. Solidarności
 
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The crosses, as a symbol of suffering, represent the first three shipyard workers to fall to the Police and People's Army of Poland. The anchor is a symbol of hope with reference to 1956, 1970 and 1976.

In Solidarity Square stands a monument (designed by Bogdan Pietruszka, Robert Pepliński, Elżbieta Szczodrowska-Peplińska i Wiesław Szyślak) commemorating the victims of December 1970.

Three 42 metre tall crosses, whose lower half depicts the life of a shipyard worker, stand in an irregular triangular shape.

The crossed were made in Gdansk Shipyards with stainless steel from the Batory Steelworks.

On the 20th anniversary of the December 1970 tragedy, the monument was renovated.

The crosses, as a symbol of suffering, represent the first three shipyard workers to fall to the Police and People's Army of Poland. The anchor is a symbol of hope with reference to 1956, 1970 and 1976.

The shipyard workers waited 10 years for the commemoration of their comrades. Despite a promise made at the beginning of 1971, the authorities of the People's Republic of Poland did not consent to any form of commemoration.

Solidarity Square and Freedom Space during the Jean Michel Jarre concert of 26.08.2005.

Right beside Solidarity Square, on the other side of the shipyard wall, is a large grassy area called 'Freedom Space'. This somewhat pompous name arose from the title of the Jean Michel Jarre concert which took place here on August 26th 2005, commemorating the 25th anniversary of the August uprising of 1980.

Since then, other open air concerts have been held, for example the Student Juwenalia festival as well as a concert by Dave Gilmour, singer and guitarist with Pink Floyd.

Zdjęcia

Recording from the collection ofaudioguide gdańsk